#ConservationThroughAppreciation

“Conservation through Appreciation” is the tagline of Karen Talbot Art, and it is Karen's hope that your Angler’s Pint will provide the time and space for many important discussions about conserving both the species we love and the habitats in which we, as anglers, recreate. This page is dedicated to conservation information and resources about the species featured on Angler’s Pints. At the bottom of the page, you will find links to organizations and agencies which Karen supports and with which she has worked.

Brook Trout

Maine is the last stronghold of wild, native brook trout in the United States. More than 1000 lakes and ponds in the state are designated as principle brook trout fisheries by the Depratment of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife. More than a quarter of these have not seen a stocked trout in over a decade and over 300 have never been stocked. Keeping these brook trout populations healthy and genetically pure is in everyone's best interest, but stressors like the use of illegal live bait, habitat degredation, climate change and invasive species introductions are all serious concerns. Over your next craft brew enjoyed from a Brook Trout Angler's Pint, have a discussion about how the state could better manage brook trout and what you can do as an individual to help insure the future of these national treasures.

BROWN TROUT

The Brown Trout is not native to North America. Introductions began in the latter 19th century under the authority of the US government, because of the species status as a gamefish, especially on the fly. Because brown trout are so adaptable, many, if not most, of the introductions resulted in self-sustaining wild populations--often to the detrement of native fishes like brook trout. Like all trout, brown trout are threatened by a host of stressors including habitat degredation and climate change. Over your next craft brew enjoyed from a Brown Trout Angler's Pint, have a discussion about the role of non-native gamefish in terms of both their ability to promote habitat restoration and conservation and the potential damage they cause to native fishes.

Cutthroat Trout

The cutthroat trout is a western species of trout representing many subspecies throughout their native range. Of all the trout in North America, the cutthroat, as a species, is the most at risk owing to a host of stressors including habitat degredation, climate change and competition with non native species like brown, rainbow and brook trout. Many of the gentetically pure sub-species are at risk from interspecific and intraspecific breeding. Most cutthroat trout are also highly susceptible to whirling disease. Prized as a gamefish, anglers and angling-related conservation organizations have played a critical role in conserving the species by protecting headwaters and untertaking restoration work. Over your next craft brew enjoyed from a Cutthroat Trout Angler's Pint, have a discussion about the risks of hybridization to genetically pure sub-species of trout and how you can help make sure that cutthroat trout have access to the cold, clean water in which they thrive.

Rainbow Trout

For many people, rainbow trout are synonomous with trout. Originating from tributaries of the Pacific Ocean, rainbow trout, often hatchery-reared, have been heavily introduced across the US and the world as a gamefish. These introductions, like many introductions of adaptable non-native species, have often been to the detriment of upstream native fishes. Rainbow trout are at risk from habitat degredation, climate change, hybridization and disease. Distinct population segments of one sub-species of rainbow trout (commonly known as steelhead) are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Elsewhere, programs are ongoing to remove non-native populations of rainbow trout from rivers where they threaten native fishes like brook trout. Over your next craft brew enjoyed from a Rainbow Trout Angler's Pint, have a discussion about the role of hatchery-reared fish stocked for recreational purposes.

Chinook Salmon

The Chinook salmon, also commonly called the king salmon, is a keystone species of the Pacific Northwest. Revered by native Americans and, more recently, recreational anglers, the Chinook salmon faces numerous threats including overfishing, changing ocean conditions and dams. The first limited run of Chinook Salmon Angler's Pints was commissioned for the Asheville, NC screening of the The Memory of Fish, a film about a pulp mill worker and angler turned salmon advocate, who uses his memories and persistence to battle for the biggest dam removal project in U.S. history. Over your next beer enjoyed from a Chinook Salmon Angler's Pint, have a discussion about the effects of dams on fishes like the Chinook.

Bluefin Tuna

For recreational saltwater angler's in the Northeast US, there is no experience quite like going after bluefin tuna smashing baitfish on the surface. Unfortunately, due largely to overfishing in commercial fisheries, the species is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List. As with many issues surrounding fisheries, there are few clear, black-and-white answers. Should there be a moratorium on bluefin tuna fishing given the conservation status of the species, or can a well-managed fishery support recreational and commercial quotas? Is a bluefin tuna taken on rod-and-reel in the Gulf of Maine and then consumed locally a more sustainable choice than many of the fish for sale in the freezer at the local Big Box store? These are great questions to discuss over your next brew enjoyed in a Bluefin Tuna Angler's Pint.

Striped Bass

Species-specific conservation information coming soon.

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